When dressing up, one needs to...Accessorize! 

first published Aug 2004 R. Kwas (changes on-going)

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Roof Rack 
Trailer Hitches
Stainless Steel Hardware

Radiator_Grill_for_Aux_Lights_281024-9

Engine Block (Pre-)heater 

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Roof Racks:  Sometimes, the passenger compartment just isn't big enough...

 Thread:  http://www.brickboard.com/RWD/index.htm?id=697541

Roof rack on a 2-door saloon [120-130]
posted by Ron Kwas on Wed, Oct 15th 2003 at 8:01 AM
[PROFILE] [POSTS] [THREADS]

TomTom;

I agree with Pearl...the Thule rack system (named I believe after that very cold place in Greenland), is a super practical, modular, quality system, with separate "Foot Kits", crossbars, and mounts for everything from skis, to canoes, to rooftop boxes, to lumber, to straps for moving your uncles' barkalounger....with the standard gutter foot kit, it fits everything from an 1800, to an Amazon, to a 700, and with a different foot kit easily also could fit more modern, gutterless cars in your stable...they have a website which I'm sure will take any search engine about a millisecond to find....plan on spending $150 - 200 to start ...not cheap ...but worth it!

Cheers

Link to another Theard:  http://www.brickboard.com/RWD/volvo/1316277/120-130/follow_question_roof_racks_122.html

 I'm not affiliated with these guys, but I know a good product when I see one ...and have satisfactorily used one for a loooong time...from the 122, to the 1800, to the 745 family truckster!

[Placeholder for kit numbers: ]

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Trailer Hitches:  I've seen a couple of different styles for 122s, from the heavier duty, European style which have an additional cross-member that attaches to the rear frame rails, to the lighter duty type, which bolt through the floor of the trunk and just reach under the bumper (also bolting to that).  Both are shown below.

Trailer hitch common on European Amazons.  Anhängelast (Load rating) 1000kg (with brakes),  gebremst, 540kg ungebremst (without brakes), 50kg Stützlast (tongue weight).  Picture used with permission, credit:  Markus (Forumname:  marksmighty on the Volvoniacs Forum)

Here is the heavier duty type which picks up the frame rails on either side and requires a hole in the bumper center section, opposed to the (what certainly must be a lighter duty type) which also bolts to bumper, and only center of trunk floor behind tank...like below.

 


Light duty hitch for 122...bolts into floor of trunk and also to bumper.

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Link to 544 hitch info;  http://jazzbo.de/volvo/ahk_BOH_544.pdf

 

Heavy duty 544 Factory hitch, with a link under the tank.
 


Light duty 544 Hitch. 

PLACEHOLDER FOR TRAILER HITCH SPECIFICATIONS

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Stainless Steel Hardware:  ...is nice sometimes in that it stays looking shiny without being painted...BUT, beware, Stainless hardware is not as strong as that made of quality carbon steels, and  Stainless on Stainless is known for galling...always use Anti-Seize when this combination will occur!

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Radiator Grill for Auxiliary Lights:  Here is a nice factory accessory for adding Auxiliary Lighting to the 122...not exposed, but behind the Grill.  Dress-up rings are added to clean up the Grill ends.  This accessory is apparently rare!

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Engine Block (Pre-)heater:  Powered by plugging into AC power, these are popular in severe cold climates, and used for keeping your car from freezing to the point of not starting, because when brutally cold, the oil turns into molasses (even if it has been changed to "winter Weight"), causes slow cranking and places a high electrical load on the Battery, which is down in performance itself due to the temperatures. 

Several styles are available, from External Type (contained in a small Tank), to Lower Radiator Hose heaters, to Heating elements which get installed into engine block Freeze Plugs.  In the case of all of these Coolant heaters, breaking into the Cooling System is necessary to install them, and once in use, Coolant circulation occurs by convection, powered by the thermal energy being added by the heating element. 

External Engine Heater:  Plumbed into Cooling System and located wherever there is room. 

Lower Radiator Hose Engine Heater:   

Freeze Plug Engine Heater:  

Each of these styles are acceptable for installing into a vintage Volvo.

Dipstick Oil Heaters:  The absolute simplest, and most commonly sold (because installation does not breaking into the Cooling System, but simply involves replacing the Dipstick), is also the least effective for heating the engine, because it heats the oil (which on the surface might sound good)...it is however, not very effective at heating the entire engine or even all of the oil because the otherwise freezing cold oil is not capable of circulating around when not being pumped...what Dipstick Oil Heaters are very effective at from first-hand reports, is cooking away some of the oil in the crankcase they are in contact with, not to mention what it is doing to the oil they leave behind in there (does cooking, and coking, of oil in turbo bearing housings sound familiar?)...DO NOT INSTALL THIS TYPE OF "ENGINE HEATER" ...EVER...THEY ARE INEFFECTIVE, AND MAY EVEN DO DAMAGE!...you have been warned!


No, it's not a Magic Wand, but Dipstick Oil Heaters are sometimes sold as one!

Blanket or surface type Heaters are installed onto Oilpan by gluing-on from below.  They can also be used under a Battery, to improve its Cold Cranking Amps (CCA):  This spread out heating is not as bad as the virtual pinpoint heating of the Dipstick type, but it clearly does not have the advantage of circulation that the Coolant Heater types have.  This is a popular solution for those who must have to deal with super arctic conditions...better have "winter weight oil" in the crankcase too!  I still much prefer the Cooling System type, for the advantages convection flow brings with it, not to mention the fact that the Heater/Defrost System will be available MUCH sooner after Starting!  

 

Below is shown an example of a (European) 220VAC powered Freeze Plug type installed on a 544.  Note the beefy and almost excessive looking installation, with what looks like a metal jacketed cable running between the Engine and Firewall.  The installation looks like this for good reason!  Connecting things in a vehicle to line power is serious business(!), from an electrical safety standpoint, and must be done absolutely properly, since this wiring must jump from the frame to the (vibrating!) Engine Block, as well as being on the exhaust (hot!) side of engine, and involves high (potentially lethal!) voltages. 

When installing an Engine Heater, even one on (US) 110VAC power, author recommends powering it by way of Ground Fault Interrupt (GFI) outlet, which will protect personnel from shocks in case the power cord is inadvertently shorted to the vehicle chassis, energizing it.

CAUTION:  When installing line power equipment into motor vehicles, electrical safety practices as well as automotive safety practices must be observed!    

Link to thread:  http://www.networksvolvoniacs.org/index.php/Spezial:AWCforum/st/id5680/Motorvorw%C3%A4rmung_(-heizung)_f%C3%BCr_B....html


Block Heater installed in the rear Freezeplug, with cabling running up the firewall to a connector. 
Picture source:  http://www1.garaget.org/archive/111/110324/338646/large_338646-3215492.jpg

PLACEHOLDER for Auxillary Cabin Heater Notes

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External sources are attributed where I could.  Otherwise, this information is Copyright © 2004-2018.  Ronald Kwas.   The term Volvo and other Brand names reader might see on this site are used for reference only.  I have no affiliation with this any of these companies, other than to use and try to keep their products working for me, help other enthusiasts do the same, and also present my highly opinionated results of the use of their products here.  The information presented comes from my own experience and carefully considered opinion, and can be used (or not!), or ridiculed and laughed at around the watercooler, or worshipped, at the readers discretion.  As with any recipe, your results may vary, and you are, and will always be, in charge of your own knuckles!

You are welcome to use the information here in good health, and for your own non-commercial purposes, but if you reprint or otherwise republish this article, you must give credit to the author or link back to the SwEm site as the source.  If you don’t, you’re just a lazy, scum sucking plagiarist, and the Boston Globe wants you!  As always, if you can supply corrections, or additional objective information or experience, I will always consider it, and consider working it into the next revision of this article...along with likely the odd metaphor and probably wise-a** comment. 

 

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